ST. Fed Interview Economics Women in Economics:
Rhonda Vonshay Sharpe
July 30, 2020 I’m Mary Suiter, and you’re listening to the Women in Economics Podcast Series from the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
Eugenics Racial Inequality North Carolina committed genocide against Black people from 1958—1968 History July 23, 2020 Our study shows that North Carolina restricted reproductive freedom, using eugenics to disenfranchise Black residents. Top 20 Scholars Education 20 Black Scholars You Should Know June 15, 2020 We highlight the work of some living Black scholars who have made ocial equality & racial injusticetheir life’s work. BBC Business Mars and PepsiCo drop racially stereotyped mascots June 17, 2020 As Black Lives Matter protests continue, brands pull mascots based on racial stereotypes marketplace Data How's the economy? vs. how's the economy for each of us? June 8, 2020 Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal: So help us understand why disaggregated data matters in a policy sense. Essential Workers COVID-19 Essential Jobs vs. Expendable Workers June 1, 2020 We need to rethink the phrase "essential worker". Lack of PPE suggests workers are expendable. Boardroom Diversity and Inclusion Boardroom quotas for women Dec. 8, 2019 Experts discuss the pros and cons of mandatory quotas for female equality in the corporate world. State of Working America Data State of Working America Podcast Nov. 19, 2019 discuss the pros and cons of mandatory quotas for female equality in the corporate world. Why we need to capture data in a way that makes real-world sense of social, economic and racial trends. PBS News Hour Economics Trump takes credit for the good economy. Here's what economists say Jan. 18, 2018 Part of the bipartisanship that Sharpe at least thinks may still be possible. MPR Kerri Miller Gender Inequality Why higher education doesn't close the gender wage gap Nov. 28, 2018 MPR News host Kerri Miller spoke with Elise Gould and Rhonda Sharpe, about the history and economics of the gender wage gap in the US.
Who We Are

Vision

A society where policy research addresses the economic, social, cultural, and political well-being of Asian, Black, Hispanic, Indigenous American, and Multiracial women.

Mission

Our goal is to disseminate research that influences public policy and promotes:
1. Equitable access to science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education,
2. Equitable access to health care, employment, housing and legal representation,
3. Equity in:
a) employment - earnings, compensation and promotion;
b) family structure - parental rights and marital status;
c) health outcomes - reproductive rights, mental health, health coverage, and family care;
d) penal punishment.

Challenges

Often research focused on women does not disaggregate data findings by race, ethnicity, and gender. We posit that failure to disaggregate data by gender is biased and treats White women as the “norm.” Failure to disaggregate race/ethnicity data by gender is similarly biased and treats men as the “norm.” Additionally, using the term “women of color” is also problematic as it wrongly assumes that Asian, Black, Hispanic, Indigenous American, and Multiracial women are a homogenous group. The aggregation of nonwhite women into a single group produces ineffective policies that do not address the needs of the most vulnerable.

When research on women does include nonwhite women, the results are often limited to Black and Hispanic women and are presented using a deficit frame; hence, the findings are centered on White women. Our research reports address this research flaw by centering on Asian, Black, Hispanic, Indigenous American, and Multiracial (when data allow) women. Our findings will avoid cross race/ethnicity comparisons unless the study is intended to examine intra-gender inequality, such as wage inequality.

WISER’s research also considers the influence of socio-economic status on outcomes. When data allow, we will drill down the data to examine the impact of family status (single vs. married), presence of children, educational attainment, and other factors that may impact the social and economic well-being of Asian, Black, Hispanic, Indigenous American, and Multiracial women.

Expanding Women-focused Research

Supporting the expansion of women-focused policy in the US WISER’s mission is to expand women-focused policy research to include the social, economic, cultural, and political well-being of Asian, Black, Hispanic, Indigenous American, and Multiracial women. WISER conducts and disseminates research on the well-being of Asian, Black, Hispanic, Indigenous American, and Multiracial women; conducts policy analysis to identify and minimize disparate impact to Asian, Black, Hispanic, Indigenous American, and Multiracial women; and proposes public policies that are inclusive of the needs of Asian, Black, Hispanic, Indigenous American and Multiracial women.

Advocating for WISER Public Policy

WISER advocates for a microanalysis approach, where the disaggregation of data by race, ethnicity, and gender will draw different conclusions for each group, as opposed to the broad umbrella of “women of color.” Thereby, producing a society with effective policies that are inclusive of the  needs of this vulnerable group.   We believe the well-being of Asian, Black, Hispanic, Indigenous American and Multiracial women is vital for economic progress.


Inclusive Society

WISER’s commitment to a society inclusive of the needs of Asian, Black, Hispanic, Indigenous American, and Multiracial women is symbolized in the design of our website:

Pink- represents the compassion we have for the vulnerable – Asian, Black, Hispanic, Indigenous American and Multiracial women.

Purple - represents the dignity we believe every woman deserves independent of her economic, political, or social status.

Green - represents our hope that it will not take another generation for society to be inclusive of the needs of Asian, Black, Hispanic, Indigenous American, and Multiracial women.


Interested in learning more?


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